Framework is selling a cheap modular laptop

The Framework laptop open, outdoors, on a red tablecloth with a garden and the wall of a house in the background. The screen displays a mountainous landscape.

a:hover]:text-gray-63 [&>a:hover]:shadow-underline-black dark:[&>a:hover]:text-gray-bd dark:[&>a:hover]:shadow-underline-gray [&>a]:shadow-underline-gray-63 dark:[&>a]:text-gray-bd dark:[&>a]:shadow-underline-gray”>Photo by Monica Chin / The Verge

Framework is now selling a $499 version of its modular 2021 Laptop 13, a “barebones configuration” equipped with an 11th-generation Intel i7-1165G7 CPU (Intel is now on its 14th generation for mobile processors). The company says this is a first for its affordable “B-stock Factory Seconds” machines that use leftover parts and ship without memory or storage included. So it’s cheap, but you’ll need to provide a couple of parts on your own.

Framework writes in its announcement that it’s also selling refurbished DDR4 RAM for half what it would cost new “to reduce the all-in price.” The base B-stock Laptop 13 configuration is one step up from the version that Monica Chin said in her Verge review was “uniquely friendly to user upgrades,” but notably lacked available screen or GPU upgrades.

The company also announced that preorders for its larger, gaming-focused Laptop 16 have made it to customers’ hands. The Verge’s Sean Hollister reviewed that one last month, calling it “the most ambitious laptop I’ve ever touched.” Unfortunately, he also found it to be glitchy, somewhat flimsy, hot, and loud — which puts a bit of a damper on the laptop, which costs $1,699 pre-built.

But luckily, if you’re not out for digital blood, you don’t have to spend anywhere near that with the $499 version. It might not get you silky frame rates in Helldivers 2, but you’ll certainly be able to whip up a mess of documents or stream TV shows without worrying about what happens when your fan breaks.

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